Poseidon Expeditions Blog

5 Curious Facts About Polar Wildlife

Hello, Poseidon April 1st Puzzle Solvers!

We hope you enjoyed guessing which one of the “facts” actually wasn’t one! To be sure, wildlife in the polar regions have some quirky characteristics, no doubt brought on by their need to survive in an inhospitable environment. Now it’s time to reveal the truth!

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Solar Eclipse in Antarctica

Can you plan the perfect adventure? With expedition cruising, you have the best of both worlds – set dates, accommodation, and a rich edutainment schedule, and, at the same time, room for exploration, discovery, and flexibility. This fluid style of travel takes advantage of occasional or rare opportunities. Witnessing a solar eclipse in Antarctica might just be the most unique of them all.

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Torshavn: Essential Information for Tourists

What to Know Before Going to Torshavn

Torshavn, named after the god of thunder Thor in Germanic mythology, is one of the world’s smallest capitals. It is located in the southern part on the east coast of Streymoy, one of the eighteen islands that make up the Faroe Islands archipelago in the Northern Atlantic. A small dot on the globe for most, these islands are definitely a must-see for adventurers looking to broaden their horizons and experience life thriving for centuries and generations in a rather severe environment. The capital itself reveals the perfect blend of rich culture, ancient and modern history, and unique nature.

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A Whale Encounter in Enterprise Island

This season we have been incredibly lucky with whale encounters! Sarah from the Expedition Team introduced guests to a citizen science project called "Happy Whale" and how to take appropriate photographs for whale photo identification.

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Ice is Nice: Part 3 - Sea Ice

In parts 1 and 2 of our “Ice is Nice” series, you learned about icebergs and glaciers. They are both formed on land and created by the continuous accumulation of snow and calving. In contrast, a rather simple ice feature at first glance – sea ice – forms, grows and melts in the ocean from salty water. It covers about 7% of the world's surface, or 25 million square kilometers, most of it being enclosed in the polar regions – the Arctic Ocean and the Southern Ocean. This floating ice has a profound influence on climate and wildlife.

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Arctic Cruise with Ola Nordsteien, Bird Researcher | Faces of the Polar World

While penguins are considered the signature birds of Antarctica, choosing one representative for the Arctic is not an easy task. The great variety of endemic species are annually joined by thousands of migratory birds, all unique and beautiful in their own way.

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The Small Ship Advantage

Travel aboard a cruise ship is like staying in a resort hotel, except that your accommodation is also your transportation. Small expedition boats and passenger ships have an undeniable advantage over large cruise vessels. On a small ship Arctic & Antarctica cruises, you retire to the same bed each night and awake in a new polar place each morning. More and more people are discovering the joy and convenience of exploring a string of new destinations without changing hotels or repacking their suitcases.

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British Isles in One Minute

Taking in stunning wildlife and historic legends, Poseidon Expeditions’ trip from Plymouth to Edinburgh is the perfect way to explore the UK coastline.

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Explore the Polar World with Poseidon Expeditions

Where will your spirit of adventure lead you next? Embark on an expedition ship for the experience of a lifetime. The polar regions may seem cold and distant, but there are full of warm memories to make and inviting to discerning travelers and sustainable tourism.

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Ice is Nice Part 2 - Icebergs

Icebergs

In part 1 of our “Ice is Nice” series, you learned how glaciers are formed in cold regions through the accumulation of snow for hundreds or thousands of years. In the Arctic and Antarctica, glaciers grow so large that they flow down from the mountains into the sea, where they become tidewater glaciers. Let’s take a closer look at what happens next.

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