Kathryn // August 9, 2018

What's the Difference Between the Arctic and Antarctica?

The Arctic and Antarctica might seem quite similar at first glance: Mountainous, snow-covered landscapes and icebergs, whales, and nesting seabirds by the tens of thousands. But they are polar opposites – literally – and in many other ways you might not expect.

Kathryn // July 25, 2018

Slideshow: 50 Years of Victory Journeys to the North Pole

Each Summer during June or July, Poseidon Expeditions begins its North Pole season. The international expedition team leads three voyages a year to the geographic North Pole, hosting travelers from across the globe.

Kathryn // July 11, 2018

Meet Jan Bryde: The Man Who Summers at the North Pole

When summer arrives in the Northern Hemisphere, there's only one place Jan Bryde wants to be: In the middle of the Arctic Ocean, high atop the world at the North Pole.

Kathryn // June 7, 2018

5 Apps to Help you Save for Your Dream Polar Cruise

Trips to Antarctica, the Arctic, and the North Pole may seam unreal but they shouldn't have to remain in your dreams. 

Scott Wasserman // March 24, 2018

Don Perovich - North Pole Guest Series 2018 | Poseidon Expeditions

DON PEROVICH

Research Geophysicist - Dartmouth College

Don Perovich is a Professor of Engineering at the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth. The central goal of his research is to understand the interaction of sunlight with sea ice. He has participated innumerous field experiments including a year-long sea ice drift experiment and a trans-Arctic icebreaker expedition. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union
Lauren Farmer // October 23, 2017

Citizens Science Project – Passengers Measuring Data at the North Pole – Part Two

Part Two – Observing the Atmosphere and Melt Ponds in the High Latitudes

Guest blog post by Poseidon expedition team members Lauren Farmer and Alex Cowen.
 
(Note: in our last blog post, we covered how we enlist the assistance of our passengers to help measure and observe sea ice and meteorology during our voyages to the North Pole.)
Lauren Farmer // October 16, 2017

Citizens Science Project – Passengers Measuring Data at the North Pole – Part One

Guest blog post by Poseidon expedition team members Lauren Farmer and Alex Cowen

Part One – Measuring and Observing Sea Ice in the High Latitudes

This past July, Poseidon’s North Pole expedition team once again carried out an ambitious citizen science program with our guests aboard the nuclear-powered icebreaker, 50 let Pobedy ( 50 Years of Victory).
 
Since 2015, the two of us, along with marine biologist Annette Bombosch, have been working with the International Arctic Research Center and the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth to collect valuable sea ice data, which is readily available to the research community through a program 
Scott Wasserman // March 21, 2017

4 of the Most Celebrated Antarctic Explorers: Do You Know Them?

Imagine steaming across thousands of miles of frigid, poorly charted waters, many of them made all the more dangerous by icebergs and sea ice. Imagine finally reaching land and then dealing with one of the driest, windiest and coldest places on earth. One completely void of indigenous peoples, man-made infrastructure or vegetation.

Scott Wasserman // March 6, 2017

The forbidding islands of Franz Joseph Land

We came out of the cave, we looked over the hill and we saw fire. We crossed the ocean and we pioneered the west.

Anonymous

The history of man is hung on a timeline of exploration, and in 1873, a remote and forbidding archipelago that would soon be called Franz Joseph Land was next.

Scott Wasserman // March 2, 2017

Nuclear icebreakers – what’s so special about them? - Poseidon Expeditions

This story really happened more than 30 years ago.

In the Russian High Arctic, a convoy of over 50 Soviet-era ships became trapped in ice fields along the Northern Sea Route or "Northeast Passage." In those days, many Russian Arctic settlements were dependant on food and other neccessities that were typically delivered by these traditional convoys. This time, however, the convoy was unable to return after supplying the isolated settlements due to impassable ice.

As the situation became dire, it was agreed that a nuclear-powered icebreaker, the Lenin, would be pressed into service to lead the other ships out of their icy jail.    

What makes this story special – and the Lenin the hero – was her power source: nuclear energy. It enabled the Lenin and her crew to prevent hundreds of seamen from being trapped in the ice for a prolonged period of time. It was one of the biggest and most successful rescue missions of its day.

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