Kathryn // August 16, 2018

Top 10 Scientific Discoveries in Antarctica

here's still a lot of things we don't know about Antarctica. The last discovered and least explored continent of Antarctica holds many mysteries, but the things early explorers and modern-day scientists have discovered are quite amazing.

From alien-finding bacteria to animals tapping into the Earth's magnetic field,  here are 10 of the top scientific discoveries in Antarctica. 

Recent Discoveries in Antarctica 

& Antarctic Mysteries

Fossil Forests

Earlier this year scientists discovered five new fossil forests on the planet's southern-most continent. The discovery nearly doubled the amount of fossil forests scientists had believed to exist on what is now the world's largest desert. Fossils were of hardy plants that lived sometime around 300 to 200 million years ago.

Bacteria (That could help us find life on other planets)

A 2017 study from the International Journal of Science revealed the desert soils of Antarctica harbor rich microbial life that can live with very little sun, no geothermal energy, and limited nutrients. The study says that "although more extensive sampling is required to verify whether this process is widespread in terrestrial Antarctica and other oligotrophic habitats, our results provide new understanding of the minimal nutritional requirements for life and open the possibility that atmospheric gases support life on other planets."

A Giant Hole

Scientists using satellite technology to monitor the continent spotted a hole the size of Maine in 2017, the largest found on Antarctica since the 1970s. Known as a polynya, the hole was about 30,000 square miles.

Seals With Superpowers 


In 2014, the National Science Foundation announced that scientists discovered Weddell seals may have a sixth sense! "Weddell seals have biological adaptations that allow them to dive deep--as much as of hundreds of meters--while hunting, but also an uncanny ability to find the breathing holes they need on the surface of the ice..by using the Earth's magnetic field as a natural GPS."

The Ice's Age

Using a Krypton-dating technology, scientists confirmed the age of an Antarctic ice sample. The result: 120,000 year-old ice. The discovery of the ice's age allows scientists to explore Earth's climate much farther back into history and potentially lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that cause the planet to shift into and out of ice ages.

Kathryn // June 27, 2018

Seasoned Expedition Leaders Share Why They Love Antarctica

Every trip, every destination, and every adventure has a "Why" and for every traveler, that "Why" is different. Antarctica and the islands of the Southern Ocean are no exception.

Kathryn // June 22, 2018

6 Reasons to Tack Buenos Aires onto your Antarctic Expedition Cruise

Antarctica often feels so removed from the rest of the world; it is easy to forget that getting there requires going through some other fabulous destinations, too.

Polar expedition cruises to the Antarctic Peninsula, South Georgia, and the Falkland Islands typically embark in one area of Argentina, and sometimes disembark in another, providing the perfect opportunity to include some Argentine sights at the beginning or end of your voyage.

Charles and Mary Love // November 17, 2017

A Front line View of the Falklands and South Georgia

St. Andrews Bay, South Georgia © Charles and Mary Love October 21 – November 7, 2017 

The stark polar lands grip the hearts of men who have lived on them in a manner hardly understood by people who’ve never got beyond the pale of civilization.”

—Explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton

After two days at sea from Puerto Madryn, Argentina, we make a morning landing to observe birds near a small settlement on Carcass Island in the Falklands. The number of species in the Falklands (over 200) is impressive. These islands, we’re told, have more striated caracaras, slender-beaked prions and pale-mantled sooty albatrosses than anywhere else in the world..

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